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> > Frank Bangay

Known as the Bard of Hackney, Frank Bangay has been performing poetry and song for over 40 years on the London poetry scene. He writes about his two passions: music and gardening for various publications including The Big Untidy.

On Kevin Coyne's fine album Nobody Dies in Dreamland

1 October 2013

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album cover for kevin cyne's nobody dies in dreamland showing the musician at home with two young boys

Available on Turpentine Records these recordings were made in 1972 after Siren, the band Kevin was in, had split up. Also shortly before his first solo record Case History was made. The story behind these recordings is as follows. Someone gave Kevin a one track reel to reel In his rented flat in Clapham, where he then lived, armed with his guitar and harmonica, he recorded these songs. A number of the songs on Dreamland would appear on Case History. However the opening track “Black...

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Kevin Coyne's Case History album includes several songs about the mental health system

18 October 2013

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Kevin Coyne's Case History album cover shows a detailed black and white line drawing

Kevin Coyne’s first solo album, Case History, was recorded in 1972, shortly after Nobody Dies In Dreamland. Last year, it was re-released by Turpentine Records.   Shortly after its release its label, John Peel’s Dandelion, folded and Case History became very hard to find. I only heard the record in the early 1980s, when it was issued as a box set with the two Siren albums. The label that issued the records in the early 1980s was called Butt records whose logo was an ashtray...

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Deep Down with Dennis Brown by Penny Reel

31 October 2013

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close-up photo of the face of reggae performer Dennis Brown on the cover of the biography about his life by Penny Reel

Deep Down with Dennis Brown was published in 2000, but is still available on the internet. In Penny Reel’s writings in the NME (New Musical Express) during the 1970s, he would often sing the praises of reggae artists who were little-known outside the world of reggae. Penny Reel also wrote for other magazines of the time like Black Echoes and Let It Rock. Before this he wrote for the underground magazine International Times. Deep Down with Dennis Brown is subtitled Cool Runnings and...

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