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This Diverse Perspective is looking for the heart of Portugal Prints

 My mind is sunshine distilled through a bed of nails, shining but hard to hold, especially also when the skin feels like shifting sands, and the soul and its perceptions seem like a mirage. 

What is grounding me and connecting me to the world are lots of artistic projects. There is a new one on the horizon: I will be part of a project, still in its infancy, that hopes to explore unusual mental states and film, which will be launched in March 2013 at the Barbican, where one of my films will be shown. 

But the thing at the moment that is stroking and calming my amphetamised wings is making this film of Portugal Prints for Diverse Perspectives, commissioned by DAO and the Royal Academy. 

When I researched the film, I went to visit Portugal Prints at one of their bases in Soho. The first thing that hits you is the warmth of the place, you are instantly accepted as family. So I decided to make a film exploring the heart of Portugal Prints. I am very near the end of making the film, just two more days of filming next week. I have already filmed their haiku event at the Tate Modern; I have interviewed Kate Horbury, the ex-access officer of the Royal Academy, about her love affair with Portugal Prints; and I have filmed a linocut printing workshop at the Royal Academy, run by the artist Phil Baird and the amazingly named Becky Jelly, which was attended by Portugal Print members who created some beautiful stuff. 

The crux of the film though will be the filming next week, where I will film at the Soho base and interview members about art, mental health, and the heart, which for so many has been told to shrink, but where at Portugal Prints, you see the greenhouse of hearts grow.

Posted by Dolly Sen, 8 December 2012

Last modified by Colin Hambrook, 9 December 2012

Blogging Workshop and the Shameless Promotion of Lux the Dog

 I was asked by Creative Futures to guest speak at a blogging workshop run by our very own Colin Hambrook. I don't claim to be a blogging expert, but I enjoy it and have learned over the years its power and its lessons. I am glad I was asked because it made me think about my process, and why I like it so much. I distilled most of what I discovered about blogging into a powerpoint presentation. I think it is self explanatory. Except for maybe the pic of Lux, my dog. I try to slip my muse into everything, and have managed to slip her into every powerpoint I have done in the last few years, see my subversive powerpoint, as an example. Although when I am teaching psychiatrists, they see it as a symptom of my madness, I see them not getting it as a symptom of theirs. I do hope when lux does a powerpoint, she slips in a photo of me! 

 

Note from Lux the dog: I do plan to do a powerpoint on doggy creativity and the tyranny of humanism in art. I might slip in a photo of Dolly, it depends. 

Posted by Dolly Sen, 22 October 2012

Last modified by Dolly Sen, 22 October 2012

Haiku for Mental Health Day at the Tate Modern.

 On October the 13th, as part of DAO 'Diverse Perspectives' Programme, I will be filming the Mental Health Day event at the Tate Modern. My film is about Portugal Prints . They are awesome and amazing and inspiring, and it will be a honour to follow them around for the day, filming their Haiku event.


This is what they say of their event:

The Haiku Festival 2012 is a pilot online social media event developed by Westminster Mind’s art project Portugal Prints. On Saturday the 13th October 2012 between 1.00pm and 5.30pm we will be holding a public event at Tate Modern where people can participate in writing their own verse (there will be a selection of beautiful handmade papers to choose from) are creating your own images, which will then be strung to an installation along with some of the best Tweets. There is already media interest in the event so anyone who is intending to join us who maybe photophobic should wear their ‘Free Pussy Riot’ balaclavas.

If you can't attend this free event, you can twitter your haikus to @Haiku_2012

 

This is my haiku, inspired by the upcoming event:

On Mental Health Day

I capture the poetry

Of Portugal Prints

 

 

Posted by Dolly Sen, 30 September 2012

Last modified by Dolly Sen, 30 September 2012

Poetic Response to Outsider Artist - Paul Nash's 'Wittenham'

 Pallant House Gallery will be hosting a few Outsider Art Exhibitions over the autumn months this year. I became involved with Pallant through their Step Up Programme, which trained marginalised artists to be workshop leaders, and was very happy to be asked to provide poetic responses to several well known - and some lesser known - outsider artists, as part of an audio trail for one of their exhibitions. I went into the studio on September 17th to record these poems for the audio trail.

Poetic Response to Paul Nash’s ‘Wittenham’

Skies are distant blue
Beautiful
But there’s separation
The scenery in the distance can never be
grasped; it needs you to be far away from it
he doesn’t want to be far away from it
he wants to cup the sky
and take it home with him.

But always go back empty-handed.

Posted by Dolly Sen, 27 September 2012

Last modified by Colin Hambrook, 23 March 2013

Poetic Response to Outsider Artist - Auerbach's 'Reclining Head'

 Pallant House Gallery will be hosting a few Outsider Art Exhibitions over the autumn months this year. I became involved with Pallant through their Step Up Programme, which trained marginalised artists to be workshop leaders, and was very happy to be asked to provide poetic responses to several well known - and some lesser known - outsider artists, as part of an audio trail for one of their exhibitions. I went into the studio on September 17th to record these poems for the audio trail.

Response to Auerbach’s ‘Reclining Head’

The dreaming bones
Drags the flesh
And steps on flowers

The heart is in there
Somewhere
Blistering truth
With every breathe
And every smile
A lie

What is it in the human
Gene that does this?

The DNA
the ‘do not activate’
helix
That twists the soul
In on itself
And unravels  
The genotype
Of a broken soul

Dreaming...

Posted by Dolly Sen, 26 September 2012

Last modified by Colin Hambrook, 23 March 2013

Poetic Response to Outsider Artist - Barbara Hepworth

 Pallant House Gallery will be hosting a few Outsider Art Exhibitions over the autumn months this year. I became involved with Pallant through their Step Up Programme, which trained marginalised artists to be workshop leaders, and was very happy to be asked to provide poetic responses to several well known - and some lesser known - outsider artists, as part of an audio trail for one of their exhibitions. I went into the studio on September 17th to record these poems for the audio trail.

 

 

Response to Barabara Hepworth’s ‘Single Form’

 Do you know what it is to be an outsider?

It is black and white for the world to see.

They think they are in the light

And we stand in the darkness

But they don’t see a light

That can burn

A hole through stone

 

The outsider knows the pierced form

The outsider is the pierced form

 

We are not the paint, not the stone

Not the ink, not the clay

 

We are what is left behind

 

You see a hole where the heart is

We see a heart where the hole is.

 

Poor you.

 

 

Posted by Dolly Sen, 26 September 2012

Last modified by Colin Hambrook, 23 March 2013

Poetic Response to Outsider Artist - Nigel Henderson

Pallant House Gallery will be hosting a few Outsider Art Exhibitions over the autumn months this year. I became involved with Pallant through their Step Up Programme, which trained marginalised artists to be workshop leaders, and was very happy to be asked to provide poetic responses to several well known - and some lesser known - outsider artists, as part of an audio trail for one of their exhibitions. I went into the studio on September 17th to record these poems for the audio trail.

Response to Nigel Henderson’s ‘James Joyce’

In broken rocks
In desolate landscapes
The human face still haunts.

I must keep making faces at my pain
I must keep making faces to know myself
The battleground for the human spirit
Is in the face.

Because the head is a strange place
Sometimes I don’t know where I am
Sometimes I am a stranger
In a strange land
Inside my own skin.

Life – a collage
A cutting out of reality
I must rearrange it
And make it mine

The head is a strange place:
A geography of something always lost
A map that takes us away from ourselves.
No wonder we rip it up -
This confetti of the ghosts we must be.

Posted by Dolly Sen, 24 September 2012

Last modified by Colin Hambrook, 25 September 2012

Poetic Response to Outsider Artist - Scottie Wilson

Pallant House Gallery will be hosting a few Outsider Art Exhibitions over the autumn months this year. I became involved with Pallant through their Step Up Programme, which trained marginalised artists to be workshop leaders, and was very happy to be asked to provide poetic responses to several well known - and some lesser known - outsider artists, as part of an audio trail for one of their exhibitions. I went into the studio on September 17th to record these poems for the audio trail.

Poetic Response to Scottie Wilson’s ‘Peaceful Vase’

A vase of a thousand pieces
Is beautiful
Perfection is boring
Broken pieces can be put together
A thousand different ways
The human being is art
Not a photocopy
Of a photocopy
Not plastic flowers
In a plastic vase
Not a plastic smile
In a plastic heart.

The heart is a pen
“It seems to make me draw
and I can’t stop the flow.”

I have to surround evil
With beauty
Surround greedies
With a thousand lines
Of kindness
Thank goodness
For the 1000 broken pieces
In my head

No need to draw the table
As table
“It’s all writ out for you – the moves
you make.”

So let your heart, your pen
Move you

 

Posted by Dolly Sen, 24 September 2012

Last modified by Colin Hambrook, 25 September 2012

Poetic Response to Outsider Artist - Frank Auerbach

Pallant House Gallery will be hosting a few Outsider Art Exhibitions over the autumn months this year. I became involved with Pallant through their Step Up Programme, which trained marginalised artists to be workshop leaders, and was very happy to be asked to provide poetic responses to several well known - and some lesser known - outsider artists, as part of an audio trail for one of their exhibitions. I went into the studio on September 17th to record these poems for the audio trail.

Poetic Response to Frank Auerbach’s ‘Head of Julia II’

The lines that make the soul
So easily unravel
And no instruction manual
To put the pieces back together
Few people try
The artist tries 

The artist
Haunts with paint
And makes strange sounds
With colour
The flesh dragged as
The rainbow scars itself
with a rusty razor 

What is the artist saying?
You have to step closer to hear
Until the dry paint sucks you in
And you disappear into the frame forever
Knowing what a thousand words
cannot say. 

 

Posted by Dolly Sen, 23 September 2012

Last modified by Colin Hambrook, 24 September 2012

Poetic Response to Outsider Artist - Patrick Caufield

Pallant House Gallery will be hosting a few Outsider Art Exhibitions over the autumn months this year. I became involved with Pallant through their Step Up Programme, which trained marginalised artists to be workshop leaders, and was very happy to be asked to provide poetic responses to several well known - and some lesser known - outsider artists, as part of an audio trail for one of their exhibitions. I went into the studio on September 17th to record these poems for the audio trail.

Poetic Response to Patrick Caufield’s ‘Reserved Table’

The perspective of the lobster
Seems a little flat
But this crustacean is deep
He loves philosophy, physics
and dining out,
picking humans out of tanks
for dinner
conversation, out of pity 

He much prefers to converse with the table
But the table is a little reserved
“Come on table, don’t be shy…
I know we live in a blue world
But there is always the bigger picture
Where outside the frame
I was free 

Where I swam oceans in the moonlight
And read philosophy on the beach
My favourite philosopher is Wittgenstein
He said ‘A man will be imprisoned in a room with a door that's unlocked
and opens inwards;
as long as it does not occur to him to pull rather than push.’” 

A waiter came and served the lobster onto the reserved table
The table felt its warmth
And knew what the lobster said was true.
And began to edge itself
Slowly out of the frame.

Posted by Dolly Sen, 22 September 2012

Last modified by Colin Hambrook, 23 September 2012

Poetic Response to Outsider Artist - Alfred Wallis

Pallant House Gallery will be hosting a few Outsider Art Exhibitions over the autumn months this year. I became involved with Pallant through their Step Up Programme, which trained marginalised artists to be workshop leaders, and was very happy to be asked to provide poetic responses to several well known - and some lesser known - outsider artists, as part of an audio trail for one of their exhibitions. I went into the studio on September 17th to record these poems for the audio trail.

This is in response to Alfred Wallis' 'Four Boats' 

Four boats
Heading towards the light
It may not be home
But light is light

You call me naïve
But no-one who has sailed the seas
Is that.

We know we are no one against nature,
No one against the tides of time or ocean
We know we are alone.

That’s why I paint – for company
I paint to calm the ocean
I paint for memories I will
Never have again.
I paint to stop me from drowning.

Why is that naïve?

 

 

Posted by Dolly Sen, 21 September 2012

Last modified by Colin Hambrook, 25 September 2012

Poetic Response to Outsider Artist - Peter Howson

Pallant House Gallery will be hosting a few Outsider Art Exhibitions over the autumn months this year. I became involved with Pallant through their Step Up Programme, which trained marginalised artists to be workshop leaders, and was very happy to be asked to provide poetic responses to several well known - and some lesser known - outsider artists, as part of an audio trail for one of their exhibitions. I went into the studio on September 17th to record these poems for the audio trail.

This is in response to Peter Howson's 'Suspicious Boy':

A quiet hand
Linked to a screaming heart
Knows

The eye
The flotsam gaze
In a savage sea
Of drowned children
Still alive

Knows 
Art needs to know
Needs to show
The broken mind
Under bright skin 
Needs to dig into the lines
That tears the soul
And show the heart
Coming apart at the dreams.

It needs to know the suspicion,
The hate needed to breathe
Without dying

It needs to know that survival
does not save you
It saves itself

Life cannot be beautiful
Ever again. 

 

Posted by Dolly Sen, 20 September 2012

Last modified by Colin Hambrook, 23 September 2012

Poetic Responses to Outsider Artist - Mark Gertler

Pallant House Gallery will be hosting a few Outsider Art Exhibitions over the autumn months this year. I became involved with Pallant through their Step Up Programme, which trained marginalised artists to be workshop leaders, and was very happy to be asked to provide poetic responses to several well known - and some lesser known - outsider artists, as part of an audio trail for one of their exhibitions. I went into the studio on September 17th to record these poems for the audio trail.

This is my poetic response to Mark Gertler's 'Near Swanage'.

Painting sublime scenes
But not seeing loveliness
I have to create beauty
To drown the ugliness
Behind my eyes, all
The horror I have seen
And known, and cannot
Blink away; my eyelids
Are broken wings.

The edge of the brushstroke
Is the battlefield
Will the war for my soul
Be won?

Can I scar the canvas
With enough grace
To save the world
Behind it?

Can I make the world
Beautiful enough
To save my soul?

I want to save my soul.
Will the world let me?

 

Posted by Dolly Sen, 19 September 2012

Last modified by Colin Hambrook, 23 September 2012

My piece at Shape's 'Perception of Balance' exhibition

I received the good news that one of my pieces was accepted for the Perceptions of Balance Exhibition at Shape Arts.   My piece is called ‘Balanced Mind’

I have been labeled ‘mad’ by society, so therefore seen as unbalanced. Society’s way of redressing that is not to help me make sense of the childhood trauma that triggered my psychosis, nor to tackle inequality and discrimination in society because of that label. Its way was to medicate me into submission. For decades I was on antipsychotic medication. I did not laugh or cry on these meds. Is this well balanced? It took away my symptoms but my life too. Is that a fair payoff, a balanced payoff?

A tablet does not cure abuse, isolation, or stigma. But I was sedated, out of society’s hair. They said the tablets would make me feel better. Please define better when I have lost my soul. Maybe you don’t need a soul nowadays. 

The message: don’t speak your mind. Your silence and submission are signs of being well-balanced.

So my art shows that the medication weighs heavier, and the promise of peace of mind, of having my life back is an empty promise, not worth the prescription pad it is written on.

I have given up the meds and regained my life. Some may say that shows I am unbalanced. I say it makes perfect sense. 

There is a private view of the exhibition on the 20th Sept. 

Date: Thursday 20th September 
Time: 6pm 
Location: Shape. Deane House Studios, 27 Grenwood Place, London NW5 1LB

Please RSVP to jenny@shapearts.org.uk and let us know if you have any access requirements.

Posted by Dolly Sen, 5 September 2012

Last modified by Colin Hambrook, 9 September 2012

Family album - thanks to psychosis

I don't know how many people share this experience, but I am a bi-realitist. Having the intense, divergent mind psychosis brings but able to comprehend the world of consensual reality, albeit a bit strangely, and in an off the wall way.

But sometimes one overpowers the other: when the psychotic side does it, I am compelled to create art to exorcise; when the 'normal' side does it, I am compelled to create lists. I needed to create this piece of art, and now I feel haunted by one less ghost.

 

Posted by Dolly Sen, 22 August 2012

Last modified by Colin Hambrook, 23 August 2012

Dolly Sen does 4thought

 Here is my itty-bitty contribution to Channel 4 Goes Mad season. 4Thought asked the question: 'What is Madness?' I could have talked for hours on the subject, but if fact the producer didn't want me to answer it but tell my story in a minute and a half. I would have liked longer to qualify some of what I said, but here it is www.4thought.tv/themes/what-is-madness/dolly-sen.

What has been interesting about the 4thought this week, when it poses that question is the debate it has brought up amongst people who use mental health services themselves. Earlier on in the 4thought week there was a woman who talked about angels, and some people who use services didn't like it, that it showed hearing voices as a positive thing. What is really shocking is that so many people who hear voices and stuck in the system don't know that most voice hearers are not in the system. Romme and Esher did a study on it and they found the difference between the two groups was that those not in mental health services felt they were in control of their voices, whilst those who use the mental health sytem didn't feel in control. 

Here is the angel lady's contribution www.4thought.tv/themes/what-is-madness/rosemarie-moore--2

I know this slot of the lady talking about angels would be very useful in my training around mental health to explore: What is mental health? Because this woman is probably mentally healthier than most people, in that she may be happy, contented, and feel connected to the world. It would start a discussion around hearing voices, and the fact most people don't know that most voice hearers are not in the mental health system, and most voice hearers have helpful, supportive voices. So when is the point that mh professionals deem it pathological? Because the evidence shows pathologising it is a sure way of people suffering more because of it. In societies where voice hearing is acceptable, it has a higher 'recovery' rate. It also opens up the question: what is delusion? Because a Gallup poll in 1995 found 70% people believe in aliens and 31% believed in ghosts. This is an unusual belief but a socially acceptable belief, which brings up the question: how much of psychiatry is based on judgment and social policing than on 'illness'. Believers of God think atheists are deluded, and it is true the other way round. The discussions out of that minute and a half clip can inexorably change and make people questions their beliefs around mental health. And that is a good thing. 

Posted by Dolly Sen, 26 July 2012

Last modified by Dolly Sen, 26 July 2012

Cheap paint creationism

 Was cleaning out some of my room yesterday, and found the remnants of some cheap paint, so I quickly created a painting of a nude, a 99p store nude. The painting is unfinished as I ran out of paint. And I think as human being, there is something not finished, or completed about us, which causes so much pain, but so much beauty too. 

As an agnostic, I don't know if there is a God who created me out of the 99p store version of genetics, or if I am solely the product of my parents' quick shag where my mum probably didn't come, I just don't know. 

The last brushstroke has not left my life yet, but at least now the brush is in my hands.

Posted by Dolly Sen, 24 July 2012

Last modified by Dolly Sen, 24 July 2012

Unwanted Epitaphs

 Inspired by Spike Milligan, and disgusted by Atos' treatment of disabled people, I created this yesterday. 

Posted by Dolly Sen, 24 July 2012

Last modified by Dolly Sen, 24 July 2012

A rare interview with Lux the Sculptor Dog

 I don't know if many people know this but I share a house with a fellow artist. Her real name is Lucky, but her artist name is Lux. I have profiled her work previously on DAO


To celebrate her birthday today, she created her latest masterpiece, called Basketcase. I think it is her most profound work to date.
I interupted her discussion with me as to why dogs have elbows in their legs, to ask her about her art.


DOLLY: Tell us about your latest work 'Basketcase'.

LUX: It is a statement about modern life, an anti-materialistic stance, basically saying: the more toys you collect, the bigger the basketcase you are.

DOLLY: That's quite powerful. But you know I am a mad person and take offence to the fact you are using the term 'basketcase' in a derogatory way.

LUX: Relax, I am just a dog.
DOLLY: So tell us what your work is, in a general sense.

LUX: My work explores the relationship between the Military-Industrial Complex and copycat violence.

With influences as diverse as Rousseau and Francis Bacon, new combinations are crafted from both explicit and implicit textures.

Ever since I was a puppy I have been fascinated by the endless oscillation of the universe. What starts out as undefined soon becomes corrupted into a hegemony of lust, leaving only a sense of undefined and the unlikelihood of a new synthesis.

As wavering replicas become transformed through undefined and critical practice, the viewer is left with a new agenda of the inaccuracies of our existence.

Dolly: I see... Anything else you would like to add?

Lux: Yes, rub my belly.

 

 

Posted by Dolly Sen, 22 July 2012

Last modified by Dolly Sen, 22 July 2012

Prescription of Stars

 PRESCRIPTION OF STARS

Finally you prescribe me stars
Not shame, nor loss of soul as side effect

You prescribe me holding my head up high
To find my soul again.

It is easier to see under a light.

Finally the universe is open to me
Where I can fly, standing still.

Because I have my stars.

Posted by Dolly Sen, 21 July 2012

Last modified by Colin Hambrook, 9 September 2015

Welcome to Action T5

 Anyone who knows about the Nazi's Disability  Euthanasia Programme Action T4, will see unsettling parallels to what is happening to disabled people now. The current demonisation and persecuting of disabled people , the media hype over disabled people being burdens and scroungers, an ecomonic strain to society,  is following the Nazi Euthansia's To Do list to the letter.

I left my last job in April due to stress, which triggered psychosis and depression (which is one of the reasons this blog has been so neglected), and knew the letter from ATOS would be soon on its merry way. And it came, as you can see from the photo I took. Forget the polite language, how I recreated it is how I should have received it. Too many people see us through these lenses of false labels, which will magnify discrimation and hatred, while the person behind it shrinks. 

Fortunately - or unfortunately - I was actually psychotic when I filled in the atos form, and thought I was Jesus, and filled it in accordingly. Someone reassessed the form and decided I needn't go to the atos interview. Give it a few months and I will be asked again to go. As stress is a trigger for psychosis, I may think I am Jesus again and try to cast the demon out of the atos assessor. Or heal the sick, who are the people who work there. Because despite over 1000 people being deemed fit to work dying after their assessment, according to atos and the government, there aren't any ill people about.

Hold on a minute, maybe we have got it the wrong way round and atos are healing people through a patronising and demeaning interview. 

Hallelujah!

Why I have religious convictions when I am an agnotistic, I have no idea.

Posted by Dolly Sen, 18 July 2012

Last modified by Dolly Sen, 18 July 2012

Laugh at least three times a day, might make you drowsy

 I don't have the talent for cartooning that Crippen has, and I have given up performing, but my comedy still needs an outlet. Facebook statuses are ok, but still not enough. 

I came across one these websites where you can add captions to pictures they have, and have been having fun since.

Posted by Dolly Sen, 18 July 2012

Last modified by Dolly Sen, 18 July 2012

Poetic Exorism

I know how to laugh at the absurdity of humanity and myself, I can laugh until my stomach aches, but I can also cry to the point of not wanting to live, and I can do both in the same day. Some will say that is bipolar; I will say it is a human response to human things.

This last year has been tough. This time last year, my dad, one of my abusers, got knocked down and sustained brain damage, which accelerated his already present dementia. That incident last year kicked off a whole series of consequences, which has made me feel disconnected with my family. My family were my bedrock of strength before hand, and I have lost my steady ground to walk upon. I have to now recreate my new road before me without knowing where I am going, and with the fragile pieces of my confused heart.

But I am not completely lost, my creativity is there to make this arid soulland beautiful in any way it knows how, or to tell the world: there is a war going on here. As Nigel Henderson, the artist said, 'Art is the battleground of the soul'. 

I feel haunted at the moment, demons are playing hide and seek with everyone of my breaths. Poetry for me is never going to be sedate, it is me fighting for my very own soul.

Father's day recently was my most recent battle, and here is the outcome:

In the old people’s home
Is my skinny monster
Hell is greying now
Hell is getting forgettable
Hell is getting old, so old 

My monster is wetting himself
My monster has dementia
My monster does not know he haunts me 

Why are you still so powerful
And I am still so weak? 
I can’t get out of the room
I can’t grow bigger than one foot tall 

The monster threw me against the wall
Kept pushing me to the ground
Every time I tried to get up 
I deserved it
I was a 2 year old cunt
The monster would leave me alone in that cold dark room.
All night, alone, the small room went on forever.
A 2 year old can understand horror, desolation
A 2 year old can want death
A 2 year old can carry so much fear
That it my heart is coated with it 40 years later 
I cried for my monster to come back 
He did come back 
To haunt me 

Another poem, along the same theme:

HAUNTED, AGED 2
What is this thing that haunts
That as a child scared me
How did I know to be scared of it?
And why was I scared of it?
An empty merry go round, frozen horses
Dancing in circles
The ice cream van tinkling its  saccharine mantra
The nursery song, ‘boys and girls go out to play…’
The dolls without eyes…

There was no screaming monsters
No violent hatred
That came next
No haunting there except the ghost
Of the dead child I learnt to become

To be a baby, a little child
And know haunted

Humanity, you were broken to begin with.

 

Posted by Dolly Sen, 28 June 2012

Last modified by Colin Hambrook, 2 July 2012

Eyes - A poem by Dolly Sen

 The Eyes

The eyes, the eyes have it
That light,
That guiltless blaze
That melts the poles
And shames the sun 

The eyes
That give the biggest smiles
In the slums, in the institutions,
in broken homes, in every
flavour of hell 

I want to pinpoint
The moment
In the falling cards of unbroken age
And find that gaze, that photograph, that day
When the eyes stopped believing, stopped dreaming
And saw the world for what it really is 

The gallery of broken souls have no visitors…

Posted by Dolly Sen, 24 May 2012

Last modified by Colin Hambrook, 24 May 2012