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Crippen's work with Disability Cornwall and the Discover magazine / 20 August 2010

One of the groups of Disabled people I enjoy producing artwork for are the editorial team of Discover magazine, the ‘voice’ of disabled people in Cornwall and the quarterly publication of Disability Cornwall.

Not for them the black and white photocopies of several A4 sheets, stapled at the corner and containing inaccessible text and artwork (often my cartoons, which I produce in full colour, end up looking like an indecipherable mass of greys and blacks with no real clue as to their content!)

Each issue of Discover is professionally produced in full colour, containing news and views from the many disabled people living in that part of the world, along with photos and illustrations that can be easily accessed.

Here’s one example of a cartoon I produced for the summer 2010 issue and involves a tale of frustration from a disabled reader regarding her attempts to obtain a new prosthesis!

For more information about Disability Cornwall please click this link.

Keywords: access issues,disabled people's movement,user led organisations,disability publications

Comments

Joe McConnell

/
21 August 2010

Thanks for the clarification Dave. It would be great to have some material here on DAO explaining issues of copyright for artists who want some control as to how their work is distributed.

Crippen

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21 August 2010

In my day young fella melad, youngsters had a bit more respect for their elders! ;-)

Arty Farty

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21 August 2010

As a member of the 'older generation' I think all of Crippen's work should now be in 'grey' scale!

Crippen

/
21 August 2010

Good point Joe. I do offer a greyscale alternative of my work for those publications that are produced in black and white. Unfortunately, a lot of people just grab the image off the web site and use it without checking with me. I don't have any problem with other crips using my work for free, but I do ask them to check with me before so doing. It not only checks out any copyright issues that may exist but also allows me to provide a suitable format for them. :-) x

Joe McConnell

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20 August 2010

Having worked on Disability Arts in London Magazine for a couple of years, I know the frustration of trying to reproduce full-colour work in grey. It was always such a pleasure when funding occasionally allowed the reproduction of some colour work. But funding must be a nightmare these days for so many organisations and look how many in the disability arts sector that have hit the dust. Just as a matter of interest (and no implied criticism whatsoever) as a political campaigner as well as a professional cartoonist, do you try to make some of your body of work less colour-rich so that it can be reproduced by fund-strapped groups? Again, I'm asking purely out of interest in how these issues arise in marginalised organisations.

An example of a cartoonist who made use of high contrast to ensure maximum reproduction was the late Palestinian artist Naji al Ali (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Naji_al-Ali).

Joe x