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Crippen looks at what Cast Offs has done for Disabled people in the UK / 20 December 2009

Most of you will have either seen it (or heard the audio description)  or will have read about it. Either way, you'll have realised just what an impact the new Channel 4 series Cast Offs, starring REAL disabled people in the roles of the disabled characters has had on the disabled community. Fed up to the back teeth with non-disabled actors playing disabled characters, crips around the UK have voted a resounding YES! for this pioneering piece of television comedy drama.

The episode that has stayed in my mind starred the indomitable Vicky Wright (despite one of the non-disabled characters who seemed to have modelled himself upon Ricky Gervais hogging a lot of the script), I found that particular episode stood well on its own with a story line that made you work a little. The opening scene where 'April' looks at herself in the mirror, applies lip stick and gives herself a smile only to come back seconds later and wipe the lipstick off was a provocative portrayal of just how vulnerable we crips can feel at times, despite the war paint.

Vicky, as with Mat Frazer and the other disabled actors have shown through this pioneering piece of work that we're not just the pathetic recipients of charity that the mainstream press and television usually portray us as.

In one of the many interviews given by the actors involved Vicky commented: “This is not something that’s really been seen before, showing us as adults who drink, swear and have sex. I am sure there are going to be a lot of people saying, ‘My goodness, I didn’t know disabled people could do that’.”

Joel Wilson, one of the producers, has said: “I hope that this will do for disability what Queer as Folk [the 1990s drama about gay men in Manchester] did for gay people: make people see that disabled people are no more and no less fucked up than anyone else.”

Some of the criticism I've heard about the series from other crips has not actually been about the quality of the programme itself. It's been more about the fact that the writers have once again focussed more on the physical aspects of impairment, leaving out the high percentage of those with hidden impairments (disabilities) who are amongst the number of disabled people within the UK. Admittedly there was some reference to the people involved having experienced mental health issues, such as depression and being effected by the way in which society perceived them, but I think this is a valid point. It's also a good argument for commissioning a new series that involves some additional disabled characters!

Keywords: channel four's cast offs,charities,disabled people's movement,

Comments

Marisha Bonar

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23 December 2009

Yet another Fantastic Cartoon !!!!!!!

I really LOVE IT Crippen Disabled Cartoonist!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Thank you to All the cast of Cast offs for such a Great Series,

I really hope to see more series , might be featuring People with hidden impairments as well.....

Marisha

sanda

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22 December 2009

I like pink pjs comment, as I often do. I wanted to add that I don't have a tv due to my disabilities (tv something - waves, fumes, makes me ill, as does cell phones ).

sanda

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22 December 2009

I like the cartoon. Any show, movie, the news, etc. needs writers who are disabled, as well as actors with disabilities...and why not tech workers with disabilities? And artists....And people with disabilities as consultants. And editors with disabilities...

Janet Alexander Tucker - FaceBook

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20 December 2009

That's great and so true!

Carley Darby - FaceBook

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20 December 2009

... brilliant!!!!!!

Katie Fraser - FaceBook

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20 December 2009

LOL! Ha! HA! Love it Crippen!

pink pjs

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20 December 2009

I thought the whole series was wonderful and the acting was amazing, all of the characters had something surprising to say about being Disabled. I particularly liked the episodes featuring Gabriella and Carrie. I also liked the fact that the series avoided the usual stereotypical portrayal of Disabled people as heroic sufferers or objects of pity, heaven forbid. The focus with each character appeared to be on their individual personalities with equal emphasis on their likeable and annoying features. Loved it! Wish they would repeat it but show it earlier as I know people who would have watched it otherwise and don't have iplayer.

Victoria Wright - FaceBook

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20 December 2009

Marvelous! Love it! x