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Crippen looks at the gatekeeping imposed by some disability professionals / 2 December 2009

Having been in a similiar situation myself, I empathised with an email I received the other day relating a story about a sadistic Occupational Therapist (OT).

The bottom line was that the crip in question was being denied the use of a wheelchair because her OT considered that it would make her lazy. The fact that by using a walking frame rendered our crip totally exhausted everytime she used it, also meant that any time she had between periods of travel were spent recovering for the next part of the journey.

Never mind that a wheelchair would make the travelling around easier and therefore allow her to spend the times in between doing something more productive!

Unless she can raise the money herself to buy a wheelchair privately, our gatekeeping OT is sticking to his determined course of 'therapy' because he 'knows what's best for her'.

So if you see a young crip draped over a walking frame fast asleep, try not to wake her up...she's probably just got back from another visit to the OT department!

Keywords: access issues,disability professionals

Comments

Linda Burnip

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3 December 2009

obviously rehabilitation, why can't people realise that it isn't all it's made out to be.

Glenn Willis - FaceBook

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3 December 2009

I've been lucky, in that regard, but I've got friends who've had similar 'issues'. Do you think OT's are failed Dentists?

Carole Melia - FaceBook

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3 December 2009

Lol, pmsl, same thing happened to me,your ability to bring the sewers of our lives to the front leaves me with nothing but admirations. Respect Sir, Respect

Crippen

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3 December 2009

Hi Mary, thanks for the input. Your comment about being able to cross the street before the light changes almost had a different connotation for those of us living in London recently. Have a look at my blog dated 20th March 09!

MARY MARSHALL FOWLER

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2 December 2009

Soon after I met my husband, Jim, I realized that a lot of people who used power wheelchairs actually could walk. But they walked very slowly or very awkwardly. I think Jane could grope around her apartment on her own. But she wouldn't be able to manage out on the street.

A good criteria for needing a power wheelchair is "Can you get across the street before the light changes?"

MARY MARSHALL FOWLER

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2 December 2009

When my husband, who has cerebral palsy, lived with his mother and brother in Bakersfield, CA, he had to dress himself, feed himself, etc. In 1976 he moved to Berkeley, CA, got his own apartment, some attendants, and got involved with advocacy. He had lots more time to do more important things. He actually got a full time job for about 10 years; something he never dreamed of when he was living in Bakersfield.

And, of course, he uses a power wheelchair, a condom catheter and leg bag, etc.