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Disabled is the new able

I was at the Edinburgh festival this year. I sat on a panel entitled ‘Disability a creative advantage’ which was a fun bit of rhetorical cant.  But, the thing that struck me most was the presence of disability; it was everywhere, it’s like a new ‘art’ fashion.  

Will there be lines of clothing?  Will, “Top Shop cripples,” “Mongs’ at Muji” and “Spazridges” be all the rage? Wheelchairs shall replace Penny Farthings as the hipsters’ chosen mode of transportation and walking will be so déclassé. Mental ill health will be the new black and weekend breaks at sanatoriums almost compulsory. Hurrah we’re all cripples now.  

But there’s a serious point to be made and it’s this. What has happened to make disability a new desirable marketing niche? Well, I think we did it to ourselves with the help of technology. What! Have we turned ourselves into a commodity? Yes we have.

Social media and technology have become amazing tools in creating a connectivity that could never have previously existed between disabled people. Allowing us to become effective activists and communicate outside our own often-narrow worlds. The campaign against ATOS is a fine example of how social media has provided us with a powerful weapon, likewise the defeat of the Assisted Dying bill. 

IDS said recently that disabled people are not ‘normal’; this is a good thing (especially if the intellectually challenged Mr Smith is ‘normal’). In fact, there is no such thing as normal. Everyone is abnormal, there are just different groups in society that define themselves by various criteria and I suppose there must be a group that use the term normal.  

IDS showed the power of this connectivity when he said that and it went ‘viral’ and when his ‘fake’ DWP stories were exposed. Holding power to account and achieving (as well as preventing) change are the things we should use this connectivity to achieve as well as the more mundane idea of keeping in touch.  

The accessibility built into Mac computers is a boon to the disabled (not that I want to praise the Satan that is Apple). Apps that let people turn speech to text, turn text into speech and allow people to communicate instantly over massive distances have transformed the disability activism and arts landscape.

Although there is a lot to both criticise and concern one about the internet and its instant, though ersatz, experience of the world, in terms of helping to create a worldwide network for the disabled it has become an invaluable tool. And here I am using it now…

Posted by Joe Turnbull, 30 September 2015

Last modified by Joe Turnbull, 30 September 2015