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People Like You - exhibition in waiting.

I'm in some strange limbo world. Five soft sculptures wait impatiently. Next week they will leave their overcrowded space and take up temporary residence in Salisbury Arts Centre. I wonder who I will be without our daily confrontation.

 


Creatives in Con.Text are People in Con.Text; these five, white figures reflect the conversations, echo the history of creative expression from the art of the ice age to the current search for connection and recognition that drives us into an online future. Reaching out, they attempt to make externally visible the longings contained within us.

Kouros and Koure, echoing the classical Greek Kouroi, are also a reminder of how young and unformed our civilisation still is, and how far we have yet to travel to possibly deserve that description.

Jessie, Fons and Kosta are both younger and older, representing the past and the future. Without time and universal, but also unique and personal, they ask questions of a future where diversity appears increasingly problematic. The physical and emotional geography we construct to frame our coexistence in ever decreasing spaces demands ever increasing conformity - a simplification apparently necessary as counterpoint to the complexities of financial structures, political powers and ideologies that threaten to overwhelm us.

They make visible questions of the longings that thread through my arts practice from its beginning and of the emotions that come alive in Con.Text conversations.


I have tasted life and life

has feasted hungrily on me.

And I have embraced the question

so there is no going back,

Somewhere the answer is wheels,

And somewhere the wheels are a game

I play in order to play the game

of life; in order to find the questions;

in order to meet the amazement

that moves me; that brings me

longing, to the feast.

Posted by Gini, 27 February 2013

Last modified by Gini, 27 February 2013

'People Like You' - the exhibition coming to Salisbury Arts Centre in March.

Creatives in Con.Text, the work from which the idea for this exhibition exhibition evolved, is awaiting further conversation with a printer, Sue Austin and Liz Crow are finessing 'Creating the Spectacle!' (film) and 'Bedding Out' respectively; 'People Like You' is coming together.

It's time to think about design; the positioning of the artwork in the space so that the whole will say more than the sum of its parts.

The five soft-sculpture figures jostle, in my head, for the most effective way to relate to each other and to the architecture on offer. Two of them are pretty much decided.

Kouros and Koure are staying together on a mission:

It is totally instinctive
the small in-breath and holding it.
The body angle, response to
spatial awareness, shoulders just
so and heartbeat nudging increase.

Without eye contact, conscious yet
unconscious; focused on other
for the instant of pushing through.

The two naked bodies framing

access demand brief encounter;
fleeting engagement with naked
vulnerability. Brushing
exposed skin, breaching personal
space, hinting towards Imponderabilia
an artwork that demands your
awareness, communicating
on a physical level not
accessible to anyone
clothed in a metal framework;
people whose personal space boundaries
have no finer sensation.

Kouros and Koure stand before steps, their own naked fragility holding traces of each passing encounter. They stand wide enough apart to accommodate any wheelchair, yet they stand before steps. Kouros and Koure offer you space to consider access: public, personal, intimate,

And they challenge you to consider the weighty negativity of being continually offered so much more personal space than courtesy, or naked skin, demands.

'People Like You' Salisbury Arts Centre
8th March - 14th April 2013

 

Posted by Gini, 23 February 2013

Last modified by Colin Hambrook, 27 February 2013

Getting back into the process

Distance is key.

Moving away from intense emotional involvement with a piece of work, focusing elsewhere, will often reveal unexpected omissions and surprises both good and bad.
This is a process I like to be in control of, so when I feel myself being torn away by random circumstance, I cling on desperately until I am forced to admit the untimely break.
I make, I write, I draw to feel sane, to feel alive and in communion with something other and far greater than me.

There are always gut-churning moments when I doubt what I do. And there are moments when I need the work to talk back at me, to claim some kind of independence.
Choosing my moments to back off, to put work on hold, to see-saw between the apparent contrasts of words and visual images, I still have a tendency to not really let go.
To not actually allow stuff to hibernate in my subconscious where it can reap the benefits of all kinds of hidden connections. I know this, I know that I am impatient and that for me the process takes much more time than I imagine.

I make much of use of my subconscious with each start, but then reach a point where I cannot carry the work lightly.
I get so absorbed in the close-up, the zoomed-in pan where the background is merely a blur and of course, the continuity.
And still it comes as a surprise to discover that there is only ever one work. That any kind of distancing, willing or unwilling, is mere punctuation in a conversation that documents and illustrates my efforts to make sense of why I exist as a sentient being.
How could I have journeyed so far and discovered so little?

I am the artwork I create.
Letting go, allowing my inner child the freedom to explode, needs so much practice.


These introspective interludes;
these opportunities to tick
box items in my kitbag,
provisions for adventures;
signs of promise, of awareness,
of knowing that leaving base-camp
might require tent-pegs maybe,
or a chunky knitted jumper;
but above all, confidence and curiosity.

 

Posted by Gini, 3 February 2013

Last modified by Gini, 3 February 2013