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Bronze - and the winner is...

For realising that there is indeed a need to accommodate some of the disadvantaged people of our country, the bronze metal (colour adjusted for equality):

At one with the natural world and taking place in some of the most hauntingly memorable venues, this installation is for everyone who has ever known or longed to know the feeling of belonging and the inspiring sensation of equality.

Motivated by some of the great artists and musicians of the past, created by innovative and fabulously talented people of our time, the work visually draws you into it's very centre and holds you mesmerised by it's soundscape.

Due to the absolute nature of the sites chosen, these venues are accessible by wheelchair only. The wheelless and temporarily non-disabled can view installation images online, or download a short extract from the opening night video.

For confirmation of this wheelless and ambulant access information please contact Lynda, our designated access professional, via our website.

Lynda is qualified to share a complete equality moment and to explain how every effort will be attempted to accommodate a temporarily nondisabled Audience.

 

Posted by Gini, 31 July 2012

Last modified by Gini, 31 July 2012

The body project.

The Hayward Rat (Rattus Flattus) has proved positively inspirational.

There is work queuing up to be let out of my head and there are days when this queue and clamour paralyse my choosing process.

The Hayward Rat has brought Kouros and the body project right up to the front of the queue. The body project aims to resurrect Jessie from 'Bare Boards and Blue Stilettos'.

At the time, she made dramatic impact, but I felt she needed to be a little more explicit. I was asking people to use their imaginations, but not giving them enough to work with and Jessie presented as scary, but also maybe a bit of a full stop.

Ever since '(it might be disability but) it's Still Life' presented at Holton Lee, Jessie has been nagging me. She wanted to join Kouros (the life-size soft sculpture of a nude male); he does have a female companion, and we were thinking they needed a lot more company; a group of them would provide more ammunition for imaginations to run.

So here in the sunshine, I've been working on Jessie's muslin skin and polyester muscles and the new man (who is actually just an up to date version of the old man).

 

 

Jessie is named for jesses

those seeking tendrils that

float in the jet stream of no

longer quite-wild birds of prey.

Symbols of symbiosis

like roots drawing Jessie down

to other connections, links

that thread through Jessie's heart.

Jesses, merely symbols or

darker, deeper holds on

unfathomed mystery?

 

 

 

Posted by Gini, 29 July 2012

Last modified by Gini, 29 July 2012

MonoLympic

MonoLympic has only one sport, only one category, only one concept: access.

The torch has been lit and you have been chosen to tweet the flame.

 

Countdown will commence one quantum moment from the designated start, which will inevitably be in advance of the allocation of the first metal (lump).

And the nominations are...

Well, in the spirit of equality and freedom of access, the committee invite you to nominate your all-time, show-stopping, mind-boggling access issue. Under the MonoLympic rules you will need your access issue to have been witnessed by a fully trained MonoLympic access volunteer (please ensure that their certificate states they have satisfactorily completed a 5 minute introduction). Unwitnessed access issues may still be accepted into the MonoLympic, but in the spirit of equality, they will not be judged.

 

MonoLympic has no connection to any other Lympic activity on the planet.

All MonoLympic lumps are copyright.

Posted by Gini, 26 July 2012

Last modified by Gini, 26 July 2012

London 2012: 3

Cultural Exhaustion eventually overpowered our group and a relaxing trip down Regent Street was prescribed to restore our energy. Out in the commercial world Chinese texts popped up here and there, 'made in China' clothes and objects brought soothing familiarity and the stress of strangeness receded somewhat.

Unable to help with the search for typically English food, I accompanied my friends into PizzaHut, where we battled our way through the complexities of ordering food we might recognise and possibly enjoy, from an unnecessarily complicated menu and a stressed waiter.

Pizza proved to be remarkably similar to a Chinese dish that is folded and eaten with the fingers, but the cups of tea that accompanied and preceded our meal did cause our frazzled waiter some confusion.

Arriving back at Waterloo we presented me to a man with the label 'assisted travel' on his fluorescent jacket. He accompanied me to our train and instructed the surprised driver/guard to get a ramp and let me on to the train: job done.

The same driver/guard took on the responsibility for getting me off of the train when we arrived at our destination. He did have other duties to perform first, luckily it was the end of the line.

 

 

Stuffed crust fingers wave modestly,

not daring to venture far from the plate,

but still adamant in their desire

to be noticed. Their small cheesy

claws protruding from stubby fat digits,

they hesitate, wave from the wedge

that is tidily folded and eaten

with gusto.

 

 

 

Posted by Gini, 23 July 2012

Last modified by Gini, 23 July 2012

London 2012: 2

Via Westminster Bridge and a complex of old buildings with a clock tower, we attempted to reach Trafalgar Square. Olympic Detours and fenced off areas took us through Whitehall and a photo opportunity with some gentle, patient horses standing beside a big label warning that they might kick or bite.

Along our route, a long, long queue of London taxis, progressing slowly and very noisily with much horn honking, was the cause of much laughter.

The prominent Olympic Countdown caused mild amusement, but the young people drawing flags on the paving, and the 'would-be' statues standing motionless on soap boxes, attracted the most attention.

With a passing nod to the lions in the Square, we made our way into the National Gallery.

Secretly hoping to steer the party towards the Sainsbury Wing and Metamorphosis, I nevertheless resisted the urge to cheat and followed my guests on their whimsical travels through the complicated unsignposted space. Looked at through Asian eyes not much of it seemed to make sense, but the individual talents of the classical European artists on display, were much appreciated.

 

 

Do you have a guide?

Oh no, we have far too many rooms for that.

Well some way of finding our way around?

We are a very big place, we get many visitors

we could not possibly afford to do that.

Perhaps just a map of the layout?

There is a Plan. At the entrance. And her tone speaks:

idiot; but maybe she didn't know

they don't have one in Chinese.

And maybe she is unaware

of cultural diversity.

 

 

Posted by Gini, 22 July 2012

Last modified by Gini, 22 July 2012

London 2012 warts and all: 1

Visiting London with Chinese friends seemed like the perfect opportunity to see the place as a visitor with almost no English; apparently it's supposed to be especially well geared-up for visitors right now.

Approaching the Capital by train, I was a little shocked to discover that my ticket was the most expensive of our party since I did not seem eligible for any of the offers available to the ambulant travellers.

Buying a ticket for a wheelborne traveller, did not alert station staff to the need for assistance or a ramp. No-one noticed me or my access problem. We were in real danger of missing the train, until hurried enquiries, in English, led us to the correct person to handle a ramp.

My arrival in London was totally unexpected; UK train staff might not have any means of communicating between staff, trains or stations?

I was stuck on the train until somewhere on Waterloo station the correct person was found to produce a ramp, and she appeared to be unfamiliar the item.

From Waterloo we wandered towards the festive atmosphere of the Southbank, and chuckled about two gigantic figures, one leaning over from a roof and one climbing up or down the wall of the building. Maybe they were robots? The building was decorated with columns of strange, green plastic bowls and didn't seem to have a main entrance.

Alongside the famous river we saw a lot of word-boards strapped to the railings. And some large empty crates that it was possible to roll through in my chair, amusing my friends. On one of the crates was a picture of brides in White Wedding gowns - one of the brides was a man with a beard and this caused prolonged laughter.

Keeping our eyes open for street art and entertainment, we were aware of posters advertising an evening dance event somewhere in the vicinity.

The multicoloured 'rainbow sandpit' where children were playing, was a curiosity that awakened some concern. Was it natural? Was it safe?

Pretty-girl crocodile, weaving through the crowd;

pointing toes, high then low and counting spaces,

snaking, swaying, dipping rhythms; curls of spine.

Supple bodies, sensuous arms, splaying fingers;

dragon-cousin crocodile: breathless, chanting.

Happy laughter woven into swirls and leaps,

arabesques, pirouettes, and smiling faces.

No special dress, no explanation, dancing

all we need to know.

Posted by Gini, 21 July 2012

Last modified by Colin Hambrook, 21 July 2012

Society: the accident that traumatises.

On the road to equality, I often feel strangely disempowered by the process of Disability Equality Training. Why is it only the temporarily non-disabled who get offered a training opportunity? And why only on occasions?

I rather fancy the idea of some training myself. Not exactly the same kind of course, but there must be skills I could practice in order to combat the negative effects society has on my moral and there must be advanced skills I could use to influence or change the mindset of those folk who never get the benefit of expert guidance.

I just don't want to leave something so important to me totally in the hands of others, even if they are experts; but I do like the idea of being proactive, as well as the possibility of making a more subtle contribution to equality.

People who suffer trauma through accident are offered help to find ways to cope. Society is frequently the accident that traumatises disabled people, but at best we are offered nothing more than passing, sympathetic acknowledgement.

Years of feeling like a leper have taken their toll, I want to be more responsive and positive to the people who have actually taken equality onboard. And with those who haven't got there yet, I'd like to find creative ways to take the initiative, I do rather like the idea of having more control.

 

 

Rolling in to a lift I need

space to turn around,

like the wheelless do, I prefer

a face-front exit.

Equal opportunity needs

Spatial Justice.

Wheelless take turning

for granted, without the need for

explanation, or

negotiation. Just a quick

foot shuffle, head turn;

on the spot, no-brains-cells-needed,

body re-placement.

 

 

 

Posted by Gini, 6 July 2012

Last modified by Gini, 6 July 2012

Having choices = being human

My new skinny-wheeled powerchair doesn't seem to be fussed about getting its controls wet; I'm starting to believe that they might actually be weatherproof. Chunky-chair would splutter and stop if I neglected to wrap the joystick and control panel in plastic protection.

Chunky's wheels however would take rain in their stride, and were never phased by leaves on the road. Not so with the skinny-wheels. That slightly oily surface that glosses city streets on rainy days is a factor to be reckoned with and decomposing leaves a decided hazard.

 

But skinny-wheels' ace is never leaving me stranded. Masses of battery capacity plus the ability to convert to manual gives me a safety-net; security I have not had in almost 15 years.

Play or pass? Who am I today? Slim or chunky? Pumpkin at midnight, or 24/7 party animal? Am I in a rush, or can I take time for a relaxed stroll? Do I want city slick, or the off-road experience?

Working different wheels is far more significant than wearing different shoes; I'm getting choices that would have eluded me mere weeks ago.

If dependence on wheels shapes my personality, am I about to discover whole new sides to the Chairborne Identity?

 

 

Yesterday I forgot

to recharge my battery.

That should mean I'm grounded,

waiting and kicking myself.

Today though I'm out

free; I have a spare

to fall back on. Planning

tomorrow has never been

this easy. The prospect

of spontaneity

rears on it's hind legs

to tantalise and

enchant me.

Posted by Gini, 5 July 2012

Last modified by Gini, 5 July 2012

The Chairborne Identity

I should give you my car-keys, you could park my car anyday.

That's amazing, I couldn't do that with a wheelchair.

You really can get around in that tiny space, well done.

 

And I boil. Spontaneous anger drives me to growl:

Carkeys? Hand over your spine, I've got wheels of my own.

You are so clever walking; I couldn't, not with those legs!

And: Congratulations, you really do work those legs well, amazing you don't even fall over...

 

There is no real logic to this rudeness. I wasn't born with wheels and there is a skill to living and working with them, so why do I get so offended when wheelless admire my dexterity and adaptability?

Why do I feel so patronised? Why can't I stay cool and offer a lighter reply?

Why have I not developed skills to prompt people to rethink the way they see me?

 

Thank you, I do specialise in Ferraris, but could probably manage a Bugatti...

No, it does take skill, practice and a brain cell or two...want to give it a go?

And: Yes, I am rather good at this, for a female I have brilliant spatial awareness!

 

When somebody opens the lid and the opportunity for change presents itself, why are we so obsessed with the shape of the box that contains us?

 

 

I used to take words for granted

and not just because I can read.

I used to recycle, but not any more,

it's an option for folk with both feet on the floor.

 

I used to just drive on my own,

without the kerfuffle and fuss.

I used to enjoy going out for a meal,

aware how much fun spontaneous feels.

 

I used to be tall; wear a hat,

take the train to town for a show.

I used to be free to roll over in bed,

but now I'm supported by cushions instead.

 

I used to air-kiss with my friends,

propel, with my hand on their back.

I used to be one of the good and the glad

now I am "merely" the chairborne; the bad.

 

 

Posted by Gini, 4 July 2012

Last modified by Gini, 4 July 2012