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A view across the pond to the island Tea House with Sky-scapers in the background

Image: The Tea House

Mutilated tans and a duck cenotaph.

I seek Japanese fabric. Something on a roll, where I could ask for a metre or two.

I love the colour aesthetic here, and the use of texture. I feel the need to take some of it home with me.

This fabric lives in the past. It comes in one narrow width, one long length - it comes in a Kimono quantity - a 'tan' - ca 35 cms wide and twelve metres long. Linen or silk, sometimes cotton, each with it's own tradition of weave and colour. And each weave or colour has it's own traditional application: the male Kimono, the female Kimono, the child Kimono, the door curtain - the size and shape of each is defined by the size of the tan.

Tailors and fabric shops sell tans; tourist shops sell off-cuts and scraps. Somewhere as yet inaccessible to me, I'm convinced there is patchwork. But the idea of cutting into, or defacing, a tan, mystifies and horrifies the traditional tailor. My search exposes the alienness of my thinking.

Wider fabric is western fabric, in western quality and colours; western fabric is cut and sold by the metre. Someone somewhere must surely be creating a bridge, opening up the possibility of buying half a tan, a quarter even, for something Other.

If I lived here, my home would be outrageously furnished in mutilated tans. My wardrobe would be full of corrupted shapes - tans distorted to interpret western convenience clothes. Even on powerwheels I balk at the mobility restrictions the Kimono imposes.

 

 

Hamarikyu contains a duck

cenotaph; a mausoleum of

departed souls. Traditional duck

hunting grounds of past emperors

awakened the need to honour

the spirits, if not the consumed

bodies, of ducks who gave their lives

for imperial entertainment

and gastronomic pleasure.

Hamarikyu is a moated garden,

with ponds and islands, a haven

for ducks spared the fate

of their predecessors, to gather

unmolested by hunters past

or present. Forgotten humans

fading in the shadow of

a memorial to ducks.

 

 

 

Posted by Gini, 5 June 2012

Last modified by Gini, 5 June 2012