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London 2012 warts and all: 1

Visiting London with Chinese friends seemed like the perfect opportunity to see the place as a visitor with almost no English; apparently it's supposed to be especially well geared-up for visitors right now.

Approaching the Capital by train, I was a little shocked to discover that my ticket was the most expensive of our party since I did not seem eligible for any of the offers available to the ambulant travellers.

Buying a ticket for a wheelborne traveller, did not alert station staff to the need for assistance or a ramp. No-one noticed me or my access problem. We were in real danger of missing the train, until hurried enquiries, in English, led us to the correct person to handle a ramp.

My arrival in London was totally unexpected; UK train staff might not have any means of communicating between staff, trains or stations?

I was stuck on the train until somewhere on Waterloo station the correct person was found to produce a ramp, and she appeared to be unfamiliar the item.

From Waterloo we wandered towards the festive atmosphere of the Southbank, and chuckled about two gigantic figures, one leaning over from a roof and one climbing up or down the wall of the building. Maybe they were robots? The building was decorated with columns of strange, green plastic bowls and didn't seem to have a main entrance.

Alongside the famous river we saw a lot of word-boards strapped to the railings. And some large empty crates that it was possible to roll through in my chair, amusing my friends. On one of the crates was a picture of brides in White Wedding gowns - one of the brides was a man with a beard and this caused prolonged laughter.

Keeping our eyes open for street art and entertainment, we were aware of posters advertising an evening dance event somewhere in the vicinity.

The multicoloured 'rainbow sandpit' where children were playing, was a curiosity that awakened some concern. Was it natural? Was it safe?

Pretty-girl crocodile, weaving through the crowd;

pointing toes, high then low and counting spaces,

snaking, swaying, dipping rhythms; curls of spine.

Supple bodies, sensuous arms, splaying fingers;

dragon-cousin crocodile: breathless, chanting.

Happy laughter woven into swirls and leaps,

arabesques, pirouettes, and smiling faces.

No special dress, no explanation, dancing

all we need to know.

Posted by Gini, 21 July 2012

Last modified by Colin Hambrook, 21 July 2012