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Semicyber

Lying in bed without my wheels, it occurs to me that I am semicyber, but being without them does not free me from their impact. And these times, out of the public gaze, have no impact on the way society views me. Cyborg or cyberbodied, in the public consciousness a chairborne entity is 'bound' to it's wheels.

Here in Japan where I have almost no Japanese, I am freed from any negative feedback regarding my wheelborne presence, by my own lack of understanding. In that way I am freer to create and express my own identity, to find my own eutopia/heterotopia.

With no way to penetrate the polite veneer of Japanese society, I have no access to the can of worms that must inevitably wriggle under its skin.

Nevertheless I retain my optimistic view of the Utopian. Japanese public, social interaction seems to function in a universal way, working for those lacking disability as well as for those with.

Is this why I'm finding it hard to find any real traces of Disability Culture here?

 

 

Over the Rainbow Bridge,

this time in the glow of

bright lights, Tokyo Tower

defying it's age, gleams

a juicy orange spike.

Tokyo Wheel, as it shrinks

into the past, colour

changes, pattern changes.

Tokyo winks and sparkles,

welcomes with no trace of

irony. The Universal

Design Museum is

closed. A power saving

measure.

 

 

 

Posted by Gini, 25 May 2012

Last modified by Gini, 25 May 2012

Two legs ok. Four wheels cyber?

I subscribe to the theory that Utopia always appears to be getting closer. And with the perfect place, the perfect society, comes the perfect life-form - the cyborg. And wheelborne people could be closer than most.

The chairborne aquanaut leads the field, being more than just a metaphor for her chosen life-form, closer to whales, dolphins and sharks than any mere human in dive-gear.

I came to Tokyo hoping to pursue my hunt for Disability Arts, but instead find myself on an apparent detour. I want to return to Odaiba, the artificial island at the end of Rainbow Bridge, to revisit the Universal Design Centre at Toyota's Exhibition Hall. Here they demonstrate developments to a Universal 'wheelchair'.

This 'chair' transports it's user in upright or horizontal positions and travels at speeds that exceed those aspired to by most powerchair manufacturers. It is being designed to be  universally desirable. Is this what mobility disabled people want? Is it a viable alternative to a powersuit? Is it anything more than a detour on evolution road? Is it sexy enough to compete?

Technology could be my best way forward: a way to make some connections; a way to look below the surface of life here; to discover heterotopic spaces. There may still be treasure at the end of the rainbow, or this could be going nowhere.

Sumida flows
contra flows
radiating
shell patterns
with no
apparent
sense of direction.
Sumida sees
me. Carries
my reflection
hither and thither.
I see Sumida.
Together
we dither.
Sumida rolls
I follow.
Today we find
a tree-lined
avenue of
artwork.

Posted by Gini, 21 May 2012

Last modified by Gini, 5 June 2012